Out-Take

Out-Take

Hello everybody,

In addition to being a blooper, an “Out-Take” can be something that just isn’t relevant to the subject material. I did not intend to put irrelevant things on this blog, but I ran across this 100% by accident and it really grabbed me. If you’re not a C&W fan, I apologise, but that’s not the goal – please pay attention to the words.

Thank you Martina McBride. I have had my share of this kind of situation, and some times we made it though together, and sometimes we did not. Below are some names that fit my description – to keep from embarrassing the individuals, they are whited out, but you can see them if you roll over the area with your cursor.

Here’s my honour roll:

  • Susan Hesser
  • Jim Hesser
  • Anne Hesser
  • Karin Caulier
  • Elena Gueorguieva
  • Alexa Van de Ven
  • Maria Villena

I love you each and every one.

Out-Take
– updated 28.02.2016

Hello New World!

“Hello New World” indeed!

Well, that is not so accurate, since Copywriting for Websites has been online for some time (since January 2007!). On the other hand, the original site (and you can see the contents via the page Directory of the Static Site) was a fixed site, containing much good information for someone wanting to become an article writer, but “static”. No changes. No movement. No interplay. Dead!

Anyway, the new site is a blog, and that invites interaction between you and me. I hope you will take advantage of the opportunity to give me feedback.

Who is “me”? My name is Craig Hesser, and I am a German speaking American English as my native language. I have long years of writing experience in the liberal arts as a student, as a technical expert in petroleum refining and petrochemicals, and as a technical and management consultant in many fields. I have seen much of the world – six continents – and have worked on five of them. I have formal training in things such as SAP enterprise controlling and customer relationship management in addition to the more traditional things that come out of my background as an engineer. I live in central Switzerland with my wife and two Labradors and one 18-year-old cat.

This site is about content – and specifically, how I can best supply you with original, unique, unadulterated, accurate content for your website or other kinds of off-line requirements. If you are interested in something other than content, then please visit http://jimmycraig.info/ or http://jimmycraigwebsites.ch/

If you have any questions, or if you want some content in an unusual format (brochures, content for an annual report, technical descriptions for the trade, etc.), or as traditional technical writing, please let me know and we can continue from there.

I propose that you contact me via the contact form in the sidebar – that will get to me essentially immediately (assuming I am online) without any glitches due to google mail censors, etc. On the contact page, you will find other ways to contact me, but the form is your best bet.

Thanks for reading this far, and I hope to see you as a valued client in the near future.

Craig Hesser
http://copywritingforwebsites.net/

Hello New World!

Copy Writing Logic

Copy Writing Logic – Why You Need To Use Logical Reasoning In Your Copy

The Logical Process

Logical reasoning needs to be an important part of your copywriting product. The reason is simple to understand for a technical reader: when you write logically, then the content is simpler to understand for your reader. Example: 1 leads to 2, 2 leads to 3, 3 leads to 4, so – in a compact form – 1 ultimately leads to 4.

How can you organise your content logically? Well, I have to assume that if you are writing technical copy, you have to have a technical understanding of your subject matter, and that you have a goal in the content you are creating. Most technical articles have a common theme that is

  1. Describe the problem or goal
  2. Discuss the alternative solutions
  3. Sum up the plusses and minuses of each potential solution, and select the optium solution

Don’t forget to use actual (and current) technical information to support your discussions; this is a critical mistake that some authors make. Think of it this way – you are proposing a solution to a problem that must function, and it must be based on realisable premises. It is senseless to propose building a factory to produce copper on Mars if you can not provide a reasonable method to transport the copper to the potential users.

This is – in theory – child’s play, but there are usually complications that make the whole exercise more interesting. For example, what otherwise would be an optimum solution may not be feasible for non-technical reasons (community opinion or acceptance, cost, availability of resources – material and human, etc.). The clue here is to go about your “business” in a logical manner, discuss the constraints and restraints as well as the benefits, and make a logical selection that your logic train can support.

Another Direction

There are other types of content to consider, such as discussions of current results in research and development. Here, it is more logical to make your copy rich in actual results from the “owner” of the idea, as much as possible. Sometimes this is relatively easy, if the owner has published information in, for example, technical writings or patent applications. But you need to be careful here, there are some limits in what the idea’s owner will publish, and the limits often fall somewhere between incomplete and misleading. This is a natural urge to cover the critical parts of the owner’s work so that others can not steal the idea, and possibly come to market faster and with improvements on the original idea. On the other hand, the owner may also be willing to dicuss the concepts involved with you in exchange for certain inclusions in your content. This can be a positive development for both parties – the owner gets more publicity, and the copywriter gets better information.

Writing Style

Even articles that are based on strong content and logic are more widely read if they are entertaining as well as technically correct. That makes it important to use a writing style that is both clear enough to be technically understandable, and at the same time friendly and open. You need to remember this: on the websites where your work may be published, if the readers get bored or confused, they will leave. Once they are gone, it is very unlikely you will get them back again. One thing that helps retain readers is images. If there are accurate and applicable images, use them liberally in your content.

If you have questions or comments, please feel free to write a comment to this article. I welcome your input!

Jimmy Craig Hesser
for
Copywriting for Websites dot NET or COM

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