“Technical” Means What?

“Technical” Means What?

In our site description on the blog header, we write “Your One-Stop Source for Unique Technical Website Content.” Now, I expect that you are pretty clear on “unique” and “website content”, but you are probably asking yourself “Technical means what?”

Well, there are a lot of diffferent “technical” areas that we can – and do – address. You can see some examples on this blog in the page called “Example Content Pages” and the pages below “Example Content Pages.”

What we covered there (to date) are:

  • a technical description of a new system for extracting geothermal energy from deep in the Earth’s crust. This was published in an online UK industry magazine called IF&P – Industrial Fuels and Power.
  • blog articles that address the petroleum refining industry in general, and specifically
    • a power play by a banking consortium to squeeze a refining company into new terms or bankruptcy,
    • what the decision process is to select the refining processes to produce different product slates (more gasoline, more light heating oil/Diesel fuel, etc.), and
    • some articles on technical details in the refining business
  • There are more to come, but I would rather write for you than just to sit here on one of my blogs! Drop me a line via the contact request form in the sidebar – I will answer as best I can.

“Technical” can cover a wide range of subjects, and I have experience with many different areas, including everthing that you do in a refinery or petrochemical plant, plus designing and building ports and mooring facilities, pipeline construction and operation, enterprise software systems like SAP and Oracle, website generation and repair (html, php, and WordPress are preferred, but flash sites can be fit in as well), commodities trading, joint venture management, project management, engineering in general, city and neighbourhood planning, project initiation and development, automobile construction, auto repairs, bicycles, motorcycles, household devices, wood- and metal-working, and so on…

Give it a whirl? Use the contact request form in the sidebar! Thanks!

“Technical” Means What?

Hello New World!

“Hello New World” indeed!

Well, that is not so accurate, since Copywriting for Websites has been online for some time (since January 2007!). On the other hand, the original site (and you can see the contents via the page Directory of the Static Site) was a fixed site, containing much good information for someone wanting to become an article writer, but “static”. No changes. No movement. No interplay. Dead!

Anyway, the new site is a blog, and that invites interaction between you and me. I hope you will take advantage of the opportunity to give me feedback.

Who is “me”? My name is Craig Hesser, and I am a German speaking American English as my native language. I have long years of writing experience in the liberal arts as a student, as a technical expert in petroleum refining and petrochemicals, and as a technical and management consultant in many fields. I have seen much of the world – six continents – and have worked on five of them. I have formal training in things such as SAP enterprise controlling and customer relationship management in addition to the more traditional things that come out of my background as an engineer. I live in central Switzerland with my wife and two Labradors and one 18-year-old cat.

This site is about content – and specifically, how I can best supply you with original, unique, unadulterated, accurate content for your website or other kinds of off-line requirements. If you are interested in something other than content, then please visit http://jimmycraig.info/ or http://jimmycraigwebsites.ch/

If you have any questions, or if you want some content in an unusual format (brochures, content for an annual report, technical descriptions for the trade, etc.), or as traditional technical writing, please let me know and we can continue from there.

I propose that you contact me via the contact form in the sidebar – that will get to me essentially immediately (assuming I am online) without any glitches due to google mail censors, etc. On the contact page, you will find other ways to contact me, but the form is your best bet.

Thanks for reading this far, and I hope to see you as a valued client in the near future.

Craig Hesser
http://copywritingforwebsites.net/

Hello New World!

How To Find A Mentor Who Does What You Want

Get Paid Writing on the Internet Today

How To Find A Mentor Who Does What You Want?

A mentor can be the difference between just mediocre performance and becoming a rock star. Assuming you find the right one. In fact, it seems that most successful authors had mentors and still have them – often more than one.

There is no question that having a mentor can help you through many bad places and worse. The catch is, unless you are lucky and someone grabs you under the arms and drags you along with them, like it or not, mentoring can be very expensive, whether it is in conventional business, or in internet marketing.

And that brings up a point – it never occurred to me before that you could buy a mentor. I always thought that “mentoring” meant that someone was voluntarily helping you to learn how to do things for yourself. “Bootstrapping with help” is probably an appropriate description. But there apparently is no shortage of people eager to be your PAID mentor. In some areas, like sales funnels, the ultimate high-end product is mentoring, even to the extent that is virtually a required portion of the product line. So much so, in fact, that it appears today that everybody is in the mentoring business. Ok, you decide that you need a mentor too, and that you are willing to pay for one. Well, the $64 dollar quesion is, How do you find a mentor who does what you want?

I put together some questions that you should go over to see if they will help you find the right mentor for you. There are some critical questions here, so read closely!

  • Exactly what does the mentor do that is common to your wants and needs? Does what s/he proposes meet your objectives?
  • Can this person really help you in the area that you want help in? What kind of background does s/he have. Does s/he have enough experience and success in their own career to validate that experience?
  • Do you like this person? If it’s a team effort, are all the team members the kind of person you would like to work with? Think seriously about that – if this is a strenuous effort and is scheduled to go on for six months or a year, if you don;t like some of the people now, think what it will be like when you have 4 months behind you.
  • What is the program? What is the extent of the content? Do you get personal coaching? Videos? Printed material? Conferences or seminars? Is everything on a schedule, or is it all ad hoc? What about recordings or minutes of the sessions – do you get copies? Is there any support outside of the scheduled sessions? This is not an exhaustive list – take a look and see what is important for you. Some people simply thrive on teleconferences, while others just find them so boring that they can’t even stay awake.
  • Who actually does the mentoring? Is it always the same person or is it a team? Do they use outside “experts”? Is it “stuff” that you could easily get somewhere else – maybe also for free? Do you work better with close contact – in which case a one-to-one approach would be better, or more on the university lecture basis, in which case you might get better overall content from a team of people.
  • Have you looked for references or testimonials? Have you talked to someone with personal exposure to the mentor or mentoring team? Did it help them? Does their experience look like it would be helpful for you, and are these people doing better noe than they were before the mentoring experience?
  • What does it cost in money? What will it cost you in term of time? Can you see that it will benefit you in some way that makes it worth more than you will spend on it? Is there a way to spread the financial costs across time? Does the mentor guarantee positive results? How?
  • Take a close look at the advertising and handout materials that are available from the mentor. Do you want personel attention? Then send them a letter and ask some questions that are important for you personally. What you get back should be a good indication of what you can expect in the program itself. Lots of printed broschures, or a specific personal answer?

If your investigation turns out negative, don’t get talked into doing it anyway – there are too many options available for you to get stuck in something you don’t like. Think also about this: if you do’t like it at the start, you will probably drop out somewhere in the middle, gain nothing useful and lose all your money.

On the other hand, if your investigation turns out positive, and it is at a level you can afford, both in time and finances, go for it! You have found a mentor who should deliver the mentoring you want.