Character Coding UTF-8 For Your Browser

Character Coding UTF-8 For Your Browser

You have seen some strange non-English characters here and there that come out looking like scrambled eggs on your browser? That’s probably because your browser is trying to read Russian (“русский”) or Japanese (“日本語”) or Chinese (“中國”) or Arabic (“العربية”) or Thai (“ภาษาไทย”) or whatever language with an ASCII English-only character code. I know, that’s Greek (“Ελληνική”) to you, right? Well, there is a way out that is not very strenuous.

For Firefox since at least version 11:

  1. Click on the dropdown main menu item “View” and choose…
  2. “Character coding” or something similar (it is the 5th item down in the dropdown list)
  3. and then select “Unicode” which is the first one below “automatic”
  4. and you are finished!

For Internet Explorer since at least version 9:

  1. On the top line of instructions, click on “View”
  2. Then move your cursor down the drop-down menu to “Encoding” (this is the 8th item down the list)
  3. Go down to the 3rd item “Unicode (UTF-8)” and click on it. Repeat the exercise if the line “left-to-right document” is not already checked
  4. … and you’re done!

If you use Chrome or Safari or Tor or something else, the procedure should be roughly the same.

Now you will be able to see all the characters for all the European languages plus all the others that are covered by UTF-8 (includes specifically all Latin-character, Greek-character, and Cyrillic-character languages). You can find more information at Wikipedia if you need any help at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-8 or in an appropriate language if English does not help you.

The original version was published on 24 April 2012 on LMDY.CH.

Life on Mars

Hi everybody,

I did not know that this “movement” existed until just recently. Being an avid science fiction and science fact fan, I am really surprised that I did not know, and that is why I am placing this post in the blog.

I have an interesting theory about how I will experience this trip. I expect that I will be able to experience the trip vicariously through the entertainment electronics of the future. It will be like being along for the ride, but without the physical bodily stress that I probably would not be able to withstand at that time.

THE MARS UNDERGROUND 2013 –

Go directly to youtube here: http://youtu.be/sB1eyHHo1Fs

Cheers!

21 December, 2014. Well, “no cheers”. I was dismayed to discover that the owners of the Mars Underground video unfortunately – at least for us – decided to restrict circulation of the video to a small circle known as “private.” However, being a determined researcher, I discovered that there was a good reason for that decision. The reason was that there is a newly updated version, released in October, 2014 (see below).

THE MARS UNDERGROUND – 2014

To go to the video directly, navigate to http://youtu.be/tcTZvNLL0-w

How To Find A Mentor Who Does What You Want

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How To Find A Mentor Who Does What You Want?

A mentor can be the difference between just mediocre performance and becoming a rock star. Assuming you find the right one. In fact, it seems that most successful authors had mentors and still have them – often more than one.

There is no question that having a mentor can help you through many bad places and worse. The catch is, unless you are lucky and someone grabs you under the arms and drags you along with them, like it or not, mentoring can be very expensive, whether it is in conventional business, or in internet marketing.

And that brings up a point – it never occurred to me before that you could buy a mentor. I always thought that “mentoring” meant that someone was voluntarily helping you to learn how to do things for yourself. “Bootstrapping with help” is probably an appropriate description. But there apparently is no shortage of people eager to be your PAID mentor. In some areas, like sales funnels, the ultimate high-end product is mentoring, even to the extent that is virtually a required portion of the product line. So much so, in fact, that it appears today that everybody is in the mentoring business. Ok, you decide that you need a mentor too, and that you are willing to pay for one. Well, the $64 dollar quesion is, How do you find a mentor who does what you want?

I put together some questions that you should go over to see if they will help you find the right mentor for you. There are some critical questions here, so read closely!

  • Exactly what does the mentor do that is common to your wants and needs? Does what s/he proposes meet your objectives?
  • Can this person really help you in the area that you want help in? What kind of background does s/he have. Does s/he have enough experience and success in their own career to validate that experience?
  • Do you like this person? If it’s a team effort, are all the team members the kind of person you would like to work with? Think seriously about that – if this is a strenuous effort and is scheduled to go on for six months or a year, if you don;t like some of the people now, think what it will be like when you have 4 months behind you.
  • What is the program? What is the extent of the content? Do you get personal coaching? Videos? Printed material? Conferences or seminars? Is everything on a schedule, or is it all ad hoc? What about recordings or minutes of the sessions – do you get copies? Is there any support outside of the scheduled sessions? This is not an exhaustive list – take a look and see what is important for you. Some people simply thrive on teleconferences, while others just find them so boring that they can’t even stay awake.
  • Who actually does the mentoring? Is it always the same person or is it a team? Do they use outside “experts”? Is it “stuff” that you could easily get somewhere else – maybe also for free? Do you work better with close contact – in which case a one-to-one approach would be better, or more on the university lecture basis, in which case you might get better overall content from a team of people.
  • Have you looked for references or testimonials? Have you talked to someone with personal exposure to the mentor or mentoring team? Did it help them? Does their experience look like it would be helpful for you, and are these people doing better noe than they were before the mentoring experience?
  • What does it cost in money? What will it cost you in term of time? Can you see that it will benefit you in some way that makes it worth more than you will spend on it? Is there a way to spread the financial costs across time? Does the mentor guarantee positive results? How?
  • Take a close look at the advertising and handout materials that are available from the mentor. Do you want personel attention? Then send them a letter and ask some questions that are important for you personally. What you get back should be a good indication of what you can expect in the program itself. Lots of printed broschures, or a specific personal answer?

If your investigation turns out negative, don’t get talked into doing it anyway – there are too many options available for you to get stuck in something you don’t like. Think also about this: if you do’t like it at the start, you will probably drop out somewhere in the middle, gain nothing useful and lose all your money.

On the other hand, if your investigation turns out positive, and it is at a level you can afford, both in time and finances, go for it! You have found a mentor who should deliver the mentoring you want.